random things i like
Search ▾Archive Theme ▾

showslow:

Ballett Paintings by Constantine Lvovich

(via kuroneko003)

vikkichu:

Giraffes
Also, you can get 20% off all prints at InPRNT until March 31st (Monday).  Here’s a link to my shop: http://www.inprnt.com/gallery/vikki_chu/
Thanks for looking :o)

vikkichu:

Giraffes

Also, you can get 20% off all prints at InPRNT until March 31st (Monday).  Here’s a link to my shop: http://www.inprnt.com/gallery/vikki_chu/

Thanks for looking :o)

thecovenis:

Flowers for C.
J

thecovenis:

Flowers for C.

J

(via adelineforleaves)

colourthysoul:

William Henry Margetson - Mary at the Loom (1895)

colourthysoul:

William Henry Margetson - Mary at the Loom (1895)

(via thomerama)

nnnnaaammmm:

mnhch: Garten mit Sonnenblumen auf dem Lande, Klimt.

nnnnaaammmm:

mnhch: Garten mit Sonnenblumen auf dem Lande, Klimt.

(via adelineforleaves)

cavetocanvas:

Jules Bastien-Lepage, Joan of Arc, 1879
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

With the loss of the provinces of Alsace and Lorraine to Germany in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War (1870–71), the national heroine from Lorraine, Joan of Arc, acquired new symbolic importance among the French. A succession of sculpted and painted images of the medieval teenaged martyr appeared in the Salons of the 1870s and 1880s. At the 1880 Salon, Bastien-Lepage, himself a native of Lorraine, exhibited this painting, which represents the moment of Joan of Arc’s divine revelation in her parents’ garden. His depiction of the saints whose voices she heard elicited a mixed reaction from Salon critics, many of whom found the presence of the saints at odds with the naturalism of the artist’s style.

cavetocanvas:

Jules Bastien-Lepage, Joan of Arc, 1879

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

With the loss of the provinces of Alsace and Lorraine to Germany in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War (1870–71), the national heroine from Lorraine, Joan of Arc, acquired new symbolic importance among the French. A succession of sculpted and painted images of the medieval teenaged martyr appeared in the Salons of the 1870s and 1880s. At the 1880 Salon, Bastien-Lepage, himself a native of Lorraine, exhibited this painting, which represents the moment of Joan of Arc’s divine revelation in her parents’ garden. His depiction of the saints whose voices she heard elicited a mixed reaction from Salon critics, many of whom found the presence of the saints at odds with the naturalism of the artist’s style.

(via adelineforleaves)

cavetocanvas:

Jules Bastien-Lepage, Young Girl, 1882
venusmilk:

Fringilla, or, Tales in verse (1895)Illustrations by Will Bradley